The Codori Family

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Nicholas J. Codori


Ebay item: A check to Nicholas for $77. in 1873.

Buried in St. Francis Xavier Church, Gettysburg, PA.
 
 Nicholas owned the house at 44 York St.
 C. Hoke-Codori House, 44 York St. 
 

Nicholas would have been 49 years old in 1858

 

 

This house built by Michael Hoke in ca. 1788 is the oldest building in Gettysburg. Hoke purchased one of the first three deeds sold by James Getty on November 30, 1787 and immediately began construction of this sturdy stone structure. In 1843 it was purchased by Nicholas Codori, a local butcher, who was living here in July 1863. Codori is best known for his farm situated along the Emmitsburg Road where Confederate Generals George Pickett's and Johnston Pettigrew's divisions were repulsed in their attempt to break the center of the Union line on July 3rd, 1863. 
 
 Story off the Internet
 

 Also information from Patti Kehler's web site, about 2001.
 
 Nicholas Cordary (son of Andre Cordary and Marie Cecile Frisson)325 was born May 29, 1809 in Hottviller, Dept. Munster, France326, and died July 11, 1878 in Gettysburg, Adams Co., Pennsylvania - 69 yrs., 1 month, 12 days old327. He married Elizabeth Martin on February 24, 1835 in By Rev. Father Doughtery328, 329.
 
 Notes for Nicholas Cordary:
 "Died July 11, 1878 in this place. Nicholas Codori aged 69-1-12 - Mr. Codori was born near Metz - in Alsace on the border of the Rhine, in 1809. In 1828 He came to Gettysburg, Pa. & apprenticed himself to Anthony Kuntz to learn butchering business & completing his - apprenticeship he went into business for himself. In later years his son Simon J. Codori was associated with him. Mr. Codori was a member of the R.C. Church - Buried in R.C. Cemetery." (see folder) (Information from the Adams County Historical Society Library)
 
 Brought 44 York Street home from Robert King in 1843, the home remained in the family until it was purchased by Dr. Miller in 1967. The home was used to house soldiers and welfare organizations during the Civil War. One 2nd floor room served as a chapel for a Catholic chaplain on duty during the Battle of Gettysburg. James Gettys was the original owner until he deeded it to Michael Hoke in 1787, Henry Hoke became its owner in 1796. Robert King purchased the home in 1838. (see folder) The original deed is in the possession of the William F. Codori heirs. It is one of the oldest and the most unique dwellings in Gettysburg.
 
 NICHOLAS CODORI & JOHN CHRISONER & JOSEPH MARTIN TO ADAM ERTLER, DEED CUMBERLAND TWP. 1865. ACHSL (CARD FILE)
 NICHOLAS CODORI TO SAMUEL WOLF, DEED BOROUGH OF GETTYSBURG, 1867. ACHSL (CARD FILE)
 NICHOLAS CODORI FROM HENRY BARBEHEN, DEED. BOROUGH OF GETTYSBURG. 1876.
 ACHSL (CARD FILE)
 NICHOLAS CODORI, FROM ANDREW POLLY, DEED. BOROUGH OF GETTYSBURG, 1848.
 ACHSL (CARD FILE).
 NICHOLAS CODORI, TO HENRY BARBEHEN, DEED. BOROUGH OF GETTYSBURG, 1872.
 ACHSL (CARD FILE)
 NICHOLAS CODORI, DIED 11 JULY 1878, GETTYSBURG, PA. 69 YEARS, 1 MONTH, 12 DAYS. 18 JULY SENTINEL ACHSL (CARD FILE)
 "ADAMS COUNTY, SS. - SIMON J. CODORI WHO, UPON ;HIS SOLEMN OATH, DOTH DEPOSE AND SAY, THAT NICHOLS CODORI, ON WHOSE ESTATE LETTERS TESTAMENTORY ARE APPLIED FOR, DIED ON THE 11TH DAY OF JULY 1878, AT 11O'CLOCK A.M. OF SAID DAY. SIGNED BY SIMON J. CODORI AT GETTYSBURG, THE 15TH DAY OF JULY, 1878 REGISTER." (COPY IN FAMILY FILE) ACHSL. (1000 CODORI FAMILY)
 
 Bill Codori - Ancestry World Tree (11/22/98) has birth date listed as 29 May 1809.
 
 Adams County Historial Society Library:
 
 Nicholas CODORI, died 11 July 1878, Gettysburg, Pa. 69 years, 1 month, 12 days. 18 July Sentinel ACHSL (Card File)
 
 
 Other way of spelling Codori in France: Kortari, 
 Emigrated to America in 1828 at the age of 19 years. (Catherine Coles)

 Newspaper Clippings: (source: Catherine Codori Cole)
 "1868: Nicholas & Simon Codori have fitted up in excellent style a commodious building on York St., a few doors from the Globe Inn for a meat market. The Messrs. Codoris are first class butchers and everything they offer is the best that can be had.
 1867: Nicholas Codori, butcher, slaughtered a hog the other day which weighed 566 pounds, the heaviest of the season. Mr. Codori purchased it at Littlestown, Penna.
 1867: Ex-sheriff Wolf has purchased 5 acres of land on the York Turnpike from Nicholas Codori for $650.
 1890: Nicholas Codori sold his farm on the York Turnpike to Shepherd Stauners of Baltimore 97 1/2 arces for $4,900 cash."
 
 The St. Francis Xavier Church served as a hospital for the wounded until September 1863. Many of the wounded required amputation, medical authorities determined that the victims of the conflict were too critical to be moved before this date. No Mass service was held during this period not until January of 1864 when repairs were completed to the church from the extensive damage done. Nicholas Codori offered his home at 44 York Street for Mass services. Citizens and soldiers jammed into the home and used the descending staircase for services from July 1863 to January 1864. The masses were celebrated by Father A.M. McGinness, the parish pastor in 1863. 
 (For God & Country St. Francis Xavier Church 1831-1931, pages 22-23. 
 Nicholas Codori was one of the original parishioners of the St. Francis Xavier Church.
 (For God & Country St. Francis Xavier Church 1831-1931, page 4)
 Gettysburg Times: July 11, 1878

 "Mr. Nicholas Codori after breakfast one morning, hitched his lively young colt team to a spring wagon and drove to his farm. The Bliss property adjacent to the Codori property on the Emmitsburg Road. New Jersey & Confederate troops fought around the Bliss property prior to the Picketts Charge. The house changed hands several times and eventually was burned by the Union troops. Mr. Codori planning to mow, transferred his colts from the wagon to the mower. The noise of the blades frightened the colts and Mr. Codori was thrown from his seat in front of the blades.
 He was found about a half hour later, his right foot was severed from the leg above the ankle, shockingly cut and injured in the groin. He was sensible and gave orders to be driven to town and his severed foot to be brought along with him, he remained in a sitting position and greeted acquaintances along the way. 
 Dr. Horner amputated below the knee, because the bones were badly splintered. His groin injurious were serious and proved fatal. He died the following week. he was in his 70th year. Fifty of them spent in Gettysburg. In 1828, he came to Gettysburg and apprenticed himself to Anthony B. Kuntz to learn the butchering business and was the leading and best known butcher in this section. His son, Simon J. Codori was his successor and also owner of four substantial dwellings, four good farms near town and sundry lots. July 18, 1878" (source: Catherine Codori Cole)
 
 More About Nicholas Cordary:
 Ethnicity/Relig.: Roman Catholic.
 Immigration: 1828, To escape the border conflicts with Germany.
 Occupation: butcher.
 Residence: Hottviller, Fr. & Gettysburg, Pa..
 
 More About Nicholas Cordary and Elizabeth Martin:
 Marriage: February 24, 1835, By Rev. Father Doughtery.
 
 Marriage Notes for Nicholas Cordary and Elizabeth Martin:
 The records from the Sacred Heart Catholic Church show in Latin the marriage.
 Nicholeus J. Kortari married Elizabeth Martin of New Oxford, PA
 Nicholas J. Codori married by Rev. Fr. Doughtery. (Catherine Coles)

 Children of Nicholas Cordary and Elizabeth Martin are: 
 +Simon Jacob Cordary/Codori, b. May 14, 1845, Gettysburg, Adams Co., PA.333, d. August 13, 1898, Gettysburg, Adams Co., PA..
 John Nicholas Cordary/Codori, b. April 8, 1849, Gettysburg, Adams Co., Pa.335, d. June 27, 1850, Gettysburg, Adams Co., Pa..
 +George A. Codori, b. November 30, 1835, Gettysburg, Adams Co., PA.337, d. October 25, 1883, Gettysburg, Adams Co. PA.

 

 


Birth certificate from Hottviller, France Courtesy of Sandrine Dehlinger of Metz, France.

From : http://civilwartravels.blogspot.com/